integrations in ecommerce - example

It looks like a complete mess. But it’s probably your system architecture – the heart of your business.

You probably didn’t know about it. Did you? It’s even worse – but don’t worry, it’s quite a common problem.

eCommerce world is changing these days. Customers expect some level of coherency between the sales channels you offer, what’s more, they want to be able to use any of them in one path to purchase. And if something is impossible in your system, they will go to your competitors.

Trying to meet their expectations, you create a colossus on the feet of clay – you integrate new elements with your existing systems, trying to be up-to-date with the trends and ensure the best customer experience. It’s a very dense network, as with any new system the number of connections grows exponentially.

Why is it wrong?

The way to omnichannel is simple – you need to provide your customers with great experiences and enable them interaction with your brand through different sales channels. But if your system architecture looks like spaghetti it’s impossible to do it quickly and without investing  large amounts of money

First of all, adding any new element to the system requires a lot of effort – you need to integrate every system with every other. New integrations are also expensive and may take a lot of time.

Additionally, somebody has to constantly oversee the system. As a result, the communicates are sent once a day (at night) – to avoid some interference that can appear. It isn’t surprising that your employees become frustrated. What is more, it slows down your business, generates growing costs and loss:

  • you don’t have the up-to-date information about the availability of products in every channel,
  • you don’t have the possibility of implementing “save the sale” model,
  • you can’t manage the stock, adjust it to the market demand,
  • you are limited in a possibility of implementing ‘click&collect’ model,
  • as a result, the warehouse and trade cost are growing.

How to change it?

divante presents click & collect accelerator

Use ESB

ESB is a software architecture model used for designing and implementing communication between mutually interacting software applications. Very simply, this mechanism enables format unification of the data that is being exchanged between systems and rerouting communication.

How it works?

ESB is a software architecture model used for designing and implementing communication between mutually interacting software applications. Very simply, this mechanism enables format unification of the data that is being exchanged between systems and rerouting communication. For example – one information sent to one system is spread by the ESB to every system required in this process.

It means that using ESB you can add new systems dynamically and diversify your selling channels easily, quickly and with less money. While adding new elements, you don’t have to interfere with existing systems – all you have to do is to integrate the new element at its tail end.

As ESB simplifies the communication between systems, it can be done in real-time. You’ll get the full control on your warehouse and products availability – and minimize the warehouse and trade costs.

Want to know more about ESB module? Just contact us!

Read also: What you still don’t know about omnichannel

Agata Młodawska

Content Marketing Manager at Divante eCommerce Software House | LinkedIn | Twitter

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